wordless wednesday


Other wordless friends—
Cheryl Andrews
Christy Ann Conlin
Kristen den Hartog
Allyson Latta

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20 thoughts on “wordless wednesday

    1. I never thought about it until now. Eek. You’re right. Looked at that way it’s weird and eerie. (I just thought it was weird.) What I like best is that you haven’t indicated whether the house coming alive is good or not. Could very well be they’re a merry band of wooden souls.

  1. This would be a creepy place to approach in the dark. Those faces! It’s like they are trying to escape from/through the walls. I can almost imagine looking back a few minutes later and seeing them re-absorbed. (Christy Ann — “Fear Itself” — will like this one.)

    1. Funny, I didn’t initially think of it as creepy. I imagined some slightly mad, enthusiastic wood-carver living there. But I get the creepy. What interests me is the idea of what’s scary, and why this is more ‘real’ scary than the fake Halloween skulls and blood and tape-recorded shrieking… I mean, what makes something scary? What makes this house scary? The faces themselves, or the fact the house is covered in faces, which suggests the people inside maybe be unhinged? And if it’s the faces… why? What do they trigger in our heads? Fairy tales, like you said, maybe. Talking trees? Never a good thing in any story. ;))

      1. I think what’s foreboding about these faces are their expressions rigidified (not a word) by silence. Like Munch’s Scream. Possibility is more likely to trigger our imaginations than the blatant Hollywood makeup and ketchup. ??? It’s a theory.
        You still haven’t said where you found this house.

        1. Alice, the house is actually just a few streets over from where I live. I was startled when I first passed it and thought who would ever do this or, better still, who’s ever going to buy it? But then I thought: what a shame there aren’t more ‘creative’ houses in ordinary neighbourhoods.

          And I agree about the ‘frozen’ quality of art. That endless ‘what next?’ I’ve been very brave in my comments about not finding the faces particularly frightening, but I wonder, would I dare spend a night alone in that ‘creative’ house?? Hmm. (Actually, I think if I met the owners/artists and knew their story, maybe then the spookiness would vanish. We’re most afraid of what we don’t understand.)

  2. Sorry, Carin, that I missed your original answer about the location. I sometimes get lost in email threads–and this is a long one!
    I had an idea that you might have come across the house in your travels, though I also recognized the signs of urban/suburban North America–the availability of red brick, thermal doors and windows. It is an odd mix.
    I’m wondering why people find these carved wooden faces more intimidating than gargoyles. Many of us have studied in buildings adorned with grimacing gargoyles. Were we bothered? Maybe because the gargoyles were high up and these heads are face-to-face?
    I guess I wouldn’t have a problem spending a night in the house because I would assume the heads would protect it. Once you get past them…

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