cedar hedge theory — wherein once something lives at your house it’s no longer invisible elsewhere

Once upon a time I didn’t notice cedar hedges.
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Then we bought a house that was surrounded by them.
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Suddenly I saw them everywhere.
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Cedar hedges, I mean.
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It was like that with these yellow flowers someone dug up for me out of a very special garden. It was late in the season and they were no longer blooming, just fronds, and as we passed clumps of fronds the person said: “Would you like some of these yellow flowers?”
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I had no idea what they looked like but the way they said it I assumed they were beautiful and at the very least ‘special’. Possibly rare.
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“Yes please!” I said and began counting the days until the special yellow flowers would bloom.
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And when they did I was thrilled with the sight of them, thrilled to have this unique specimen.
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Then I went for a walk.

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5 thoughts on “cedar hedge theory — wherein once something lives at your house it’s no longer invisible elsewhere

    1. Susan, I looked up alamanda and I see that it’s a shrub with glossy leaves rather than fronds — I suspect ours is some kind of lily — but the flowers themselves are almost identical. Which is curious. I wonder if it’s a weird sort of travelling plant that maintains the same blossom with different ‘bodies’ adapted to its location — so that in the desert it might appear in the form of a cactus while in the everglades it’s a blooming moss… In any case, it appears to be taking over the world.
      (:

    1. Well they’re not the unique specimens I thought they were, but I must say they’re darling little ubiquitous souls. Seems they grow in zones 3-9 (I looked it up!), so maybe you can find some out there. I wonder if, because they’re lilies, you might find the bulbs in Fall. Stella d’Oro Daylily is the name. Failing that I’ll have to dig one of ours up, water it well and send it by carrier pigeon. Which I don’t mind doing one tiny bit… Of course I can’t speak for the pigeon.

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