savoury sentences from several sources, part 3

 

“I imagined her at her closet, deciding what you’d wear to go learn something about your child that just might break your heart.”

from We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves,  by Karen Joy Fowler

 

“She said it with just a hint of bitterness in her voice, enough that I could taste it, like a squeeze of lemon in a glass of milk.”

— from ‘Serendipity’ in the collection Flesh & Blood,  by Michael Crummey

 

“She had no children and beautiful shoes in a range of colours, and each pair had its own matching bag.”

— from ‘The Green Road’,  by Anne Enright

 

“It surprises me that he could have seen any delight in Toby Whittaker, an exhausted-looking young man who, after shaking hands, said not a word from first to last, but whose silence emitted a faint air of disaster and gin.”

— from ‘A Serious Widow’,  by Constance Beresford-Howe

 

“Recently, everything around me felt familiar yet amiss, like the first time you ride in the back seat of your own car.”

— from  Let the Northern Lights Erase your Name,  by Vendela Vida

 

“The smoke in the dark looked like a dove that whispered the future to saints in paintings.”

— from Lullabies for Little Criminals,  by Heather O’Neill

 

“Home was something that you could fit into a suitcase and move in a taxi for ten dollars.”

— from Lullabies for Little Criminals,  by Heather O’Neill

 

“The mixture of cafe au lait and impatience was producing an exquisite vibration.”

— from Still Life,  by Louise Penny

 

“The problem is he married a Pole. Turns out she doesn’t know her arse from her elbow. Doesn’t even keep Keen’s mustard on hand.”

— from Are you Ready to be Lucky?,  by Rosemary Nixon

 

“That was the trouble with grown-ups: they always wanted to be the centre of attention, with their battering rams of food, and their sleep routines and their obsession with making you learn what they knew and forget what they had forgotten.”

— from Mother’s Milk,  by Edward St. Aubyn

 

“They were not merely sentences but compressed moments that burst when you read them.”

— from the essay, ‘Thank you, Esther Forbes’, by George Saunders

♦♦♦
 

More sentences here 710px-Woman_reading,_1930s

and here.

 

 

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4 thoughts on “savoury sentences from several sources, part 3

  1. This is fantastic: “familiar yet amiss, like the first time you ride in the back seat of your own car”

    I bet there are plenty of people who never, ever ride in the back seat of their own car. It is a truly odd feeling, especially if you’ve owned the car for many years. Now I want to think of other situations that would feel familiar yet amiss. Something to ponder while I walk the dog.

    1. Now I’m wondering if there are more such moments for us as kids or adults — kids don’t have as much control over their environment… but adults have had more time to become entrenched in the ‘familiar’. Hmmm. I may need to get a dog myself just to work this stuff out…

  2. “Are You Ready to be Lucky” is so full of “savoury sentences” that I plan to read it again. Brilliant book and so well crafted. I was delighted to see the Keen’s mustard reference — it so captures his idiotic and skewed sense of grace and good manners that he is totally lacking. Such a cruel and dull human. So many laugh-out-loud moments of irony. Lovely stories!!

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